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Adding Salt to Your Food May Significantly Increase Stomach Cancer Risk


Researchers have found that over-salting your food may put you at risk of developing some types of cancer.

A new study shows that people who add salt to their food are 40% more likely to develop stomach cancer than those who do not. Stomach cancer journal.

Read more: Compare the best health savings accounts

This study confirms other studies that have found links between… High salt consumption and stomach cancer in Asian countries, where saltier foods are commonly eaten.

Salty food
Stock image of a person adding salt to eggs. People who add salt to their food are more likely to develop stomach cancer.

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“Our research shows the relationship between frequent salt addition and stomach cancer in Western countries as well,” study author Selma Kronsteiner-Gesevic, a researcher at the Medoni Center for Public Health in Vienna, said in a statement.

Americans consume more than 3,400 mg of salt per day on average, according to a World Health Organization report Center for Disease ControlHigher than the recommended amount of 2,300 mg of salt per day.

The researchers – from the Medical University of Vienna in Austria – analyzed data collected from more than 470,000 adults across the UK between 2006 and 2010. Participants were asked a number of questions, including “How often do you add salt to your food?” They then compared the questionnaire answers to the levels of salt detected in the urine of cancer patients.

They discovered that people who often or always added salt to their food were 39 percent more likely to develop stomach cancer over an 11-year period than those who added little or no salt.

“Our results also held up well taking into account demographic, socioeconomic and lifestyle factors and were fully valid for prevalent comorbidities,” Kronsteiner-Gesevic said.

However, this 40 percent increase represents an already relatively small risk. The lifetime risk of developing stomach cancer is about 1 in 101 for men and 1 in 155 for women, according to the American Cancer Society.

stomach cancer It is the fifth most common type of cancer, and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Other risk factors include infection with bacteria Helicobacter pyloriAge, smoking, chronic gastritis, and obesity.

stomach cancer
Stock photography of stomach cancer. People who eat more salt are more likely to develop stomach cancer.

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In the United States, the five-year survival rate for stomach cancer is about 33 percent. However, if the cancer is detected before it spreads beyond the stomach, the five-year survival rate rises to 72 percent. Unfortunately, only one in three cases of stomach cancer in the United States are diagnosed at this early stage.

“With our study, we want to raise awareness of the negative effects of very high salt consumption and provide a basis for stomach cancer prevention measures,” said Tilman Kuhn, study co-author and researcher at the MedUni Vienna Center for Public Health. In the statement.

Do you have advice about a science story that Newsweek Should it cover? Do you have a question about stomach cancer? Let us know at science@newsweek.com.

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Newsweek is committed to challenging conventional wisdom and finding connections in the search for common ground.

Newsweek is committed to challenging conventional wisdom and finding connections in the search for common ground.



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