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Government and development partners unite to advance care economy in Bangladesh


Dhaka (ISIS News) – Recently Clear time usage The Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, with support from UN Women, revealed that Bangladeshi women perform more than seven times as much unpaid care and domestic work as men. This work, largely invisible and undervalued, is linked to traditional domestic roles that are deeply rooted in cultural norms and considered low-skilled.

The woman said: “It is important to realize that “care” is an integral part of us, that the need for care must be recognized first and means of redistributing care must be identified to reduce this burden of care on women.” Simin Hussein Al-Raimi, Member of Parliament, Minister of State at the Ministry of Women and Children Affairs.

Ms. Simin Hussein Al-Raimi, Member of Parliament, Minister of State for Women and Children’s Affairs, and Nazma Mubarak, Secretary of the Ministry of Women’s and Children’s Affairs

© © UN Women


Ms. Simin Hussein Al-Raimi, Member of Parliament, Minister of State for Women and Children’s Affairs, and Nazma Mubarak, Secretary of the Ministry of Women’s and Children’s Affairs

During the event, the ILO and UN Women presented a new joint program concept to encourage changes in practices and behaviors that address discriminatory social norms around care work. The program aims to integrate gender transformation measures into national and sectoral policies, in line with the Sustainable Development Goals Universal frame 5R On decent care work: recognizing, reducing and redistributing unpaid care work, and rewarding and representing paid care work. This includes improving labor market policies and governance to promote decent work opportunities in the care sector and enhance access to social care infrastructure and services.

The two agencies also made recommendations to increase investments in the care economy. These included improving access to gender-sensitive care policies and services, strengthening social and physical infrastructure, creating decent work opportunities, and addressing social norms and the gender division of labor.

Mr. Tuomo Pottinen, Country Director of the ILO Country Office in Bangladesh and Ms. Gwen Lewis, UN Resident Coordinator in Bangladesh

© ©International Labor Organization


Mr. Tuomo Pottinen, Country Director of the ILO Country Office in Bangladesh and Ms. Gwen Lewis, UN Resident Coordinator in Bangladesh

Ms. Gwen Lewis, UN Resident Coordinator in Bangladesh, highlighted the economic and social benefits of investing in the care economy. “Investing in the care economy means creating opportunities for decent work – especially to enable women’s greater participation in the workforce, reducing gender and intersectional inequalities including the gender gap in employment, and expanding the means to ensure better quality and affordable care services for all. Hence, investing in the care economy and transformative care policies is not only a wise economic choice, but also an important step towards achieving gender equality and social justice.

The discussion emphasized that investing in welfare policies and infrastructure in Bangladesh is a strategic economic decision. Allocating 3.99% of GDP to the care sectors could generate nearly seven million new jobs by 2035, 91% of which will be formal jobs for women. This investment can significantly reduce the gender employment gap while promoting gender equality, social justice and human rights. In addition, investments in innovative, time-saving solutions can significantly reduce the burden associated with household chores and work.

“The National Women Development Policy (NWDP) is currently under review and aims to address critical needs, including transportation, housing, accommodation, separate toilets and toilets, as well as day care,” Ms. Nazma Mubarak, Secretary of the Ministry of Women and Children Affairs noted. Centers where women work in greater numbers.”

Representatives of development partners

© © UN Women


Representatives of development partners

The ILO provides technical support to the Government of Bangladesh to institutionalize the care economy through the development of qualification packages for caregiving training for young people potentially participating in the local or international labor market. This training includes both childcare and elderly care. European Union And Government of Canada These initiatives, which aim to create dignified labor migration opportunities for aspiring migrant workers, have been funded. So far, about three hundred young people have been trained in various training institutes, and 70% of them are now either self-employed or gainfully employed.

Mr. Tuomo Poutiainen said: “Care work should be recognized and valued as an essential contribution to society and the economy. Government leadership and collaboration with the private sector will be crucial in developing the right policies and skills to ensure fair wages, good working conditions and quality care services in Bangladesh.”

While the ILO has long been engaged in creating a robust system for training skilled caregivers, the new ILO-UN Women joint program will focus renewed efforts to strengthen the care economy by providing normative and policy support to the government in strengthening comprehensive care infrastructure. . This joint initiative includes reshaping policies to enable greater investment in the care economy.



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